Pharmaceutical Company Sponsored Chemist Leads Attack to Censor Homeopathy Research Study

A chemist funded by a pharmaceutical company head is attacking and attempting to censor a research study on the homeopathic treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The study is being done by professors and researchers at the University of Toronto in Canada. The chemist, Joe Schwarcz is funded to attack homeopathy by the head of a pharmaceutical company who also funds other anti homeopathy skeptic groups.

Heather Boon, Dean of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Pharmacy, responded to the attack by saying, “The study comes after years of consultations and a pilot project that observed patient experiences using homeopathic remedies to treat ADHD. We found that over 60 per cent of the patients improved.”

According to the Toronto Star newspaper, the drug company funded chemist has organized a group of scientists to sign a letter that would censor and stop this research and any research into homeopathy. Homeopathy is the second largest form of medicine in the world and has a 200 year history of safety and efficacy.

The Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry found that the total spending on ADHD is up to $266 billion a year. Sales of prescription drugs for ADHD treatment doubled between 2007 and 2012, going from $4 billion to $9 billion. Homeopathy offers a viable and inexpensive alternative and the University of Toronto study is a scientific validation of this.

Montreal Gazette Newspaper Publishes Pharmaceutical Industry Funded Anti-Homeopathy “Research”

The Montreal Gazette has published a number of articles by a pharmaceutical industry funded chemist who is attacking homeopathy, consumers of homeopathy and practitioners. We have learned that the newspaper has not published any letters from pro- homeopathy sources except for one opinion by a leader of a consumer movement supporting homeopathy. Nor have they revealed the source of the chemist’s funding. So we publish this letter to the editor which was sent to us . The letter has been adapted and edited for this web site:

Joe  Schwarcz a chemist who claims to have done some anti-homeopathy “research”  is being funded to publicly malign homeopathy by a Director of a pharmaceutical company and owner of one of the leading companies in the design and manufacturing of pharmaceutical packaging. The funder’s bias is clear and rather than real research, Joe Schwarcz offers highly publicized negative opinions. And so the question has to be asked, is Joe Schwarcz, who is completely untrained in medicine, really giving consumers a fair view of homeopathy, a 200 year old alternative to pharmaceutical medicine?

As pharmaceutical companies seek more emerging markets such as in India and Brazil, where homeopathy is popular, they are attempting world wide to malign its positive, safe and effective results. This is in the form of funding “skeptic” groups and individuals. 

There are many scientific studies showing homeopathy has beneficial effect for a myriad of medical problems.  Particularly in France and Germany where it is used by 1000s of well trained (in science) Medical Doctors.

For example, a long term study approved by the French National Data-Protection Commission and The French National Council of Physicians has shown that homeopathy patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain had a 50 percent reduced use of conventional pain medication, while homeopathy patients with acute musculoskeletal pain had a 38 percent reduced use.

Another example is a study using a homeopathic remedy with menopausal women experiencing hot flashes in 35 active gynaecologists’ practices in France showing dramatic success. Researchers are now recommending it as a “new therapeutic option with a safe profile for hot flashes in menopausal women”

What would be more valuable for readers of that newspaper would be to interview the medical doctors,  gynaecologists and researchers who led these studies. It would be good to hear from Medical doctors who positively embrace homeopathy rather than a chemist funded by pharmaceutical company interests.