Skeptical Researcher Reluctantly Admits Homeopathy Works

An article in the New Scientist points out how a pharmacologist who was attempting to debunk homeopathy had to reluctantly admit that it works.

 

MADELEINE Ennis, a pharmacologist at Queen’s University, Belfast, was the scourge of homeopathy. She railed against its claims that a chemical remedy could be diluted to the point where a sample was unlikely to contain a single molecule of anything but water, and yet still have a healing effect. Until, that is, she set out to prove once and for all that homeopathy was bunkum.

In her most recent paper, Ennis describes how her team looked at the effects of ultra-dilute solutions of histamine on human white blood cells involved in inflammation. These “basophils” release histamine when the cells are under attack. Once released, the histamine stops them releasing any more. The study, replicated in four different labs, found that homeopathic solutions – so dilute that they probably didn’t contain a single histamine molecule – worked just like histamine. Ennis might not be happy with the homeopaths’ claims, but she admits that an effect cannot be ruled out.

One Response

  1. It is interesting that we received a comment on this post that had some very unsubstantiated rumors about this experiment. Thus the comment is unpublished.

    The attack on this good professional’s stature demonstrates what will happen when someone attempts to bring an experiment about homeopathy. Particularly if the experiment shows that homeopathy scientifically works and is therefore plausible.

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